The City of Mobile Services

 
Our studio will invert the question of urban mobility, asking not how individuals can most efficiently navigate the static map of the built metropolis, but how the city's various systems and services, from policing to entertainment, can instead come to them. Through a series of case studies, site visits, and design challenges, we will explore the city of mobile services, from the familiar—ice cream trucks, food carts, bike messengers, and tow trucks—to the often radically unexpected, such as California's RV pot dispensaries or mobile lethal-injection facilities in China. Our ultimate goal is to add to the already rich landscape of urban mobile services through proposals of our own. What has yet to be mobilized, what would it look like if it was, and how might this de-anchoring reformulate the city?

Under Over Out

 
The American city is resurgent after decades of wallowing in the shadow of its suburban neighbors. Increased density means forgotten corners of the city are ripe for architectural speculation. These spaces need more than a renovation - they need to be restitched into the city's network of transportation, communication and culture. "Under Over Out" is interested in the intersection of architecture and mobility where mobility is more than mere physical conveyance. Technology has shifted the nature of 'being somewhere'—like digitally checking into a place—and we will explore how architecture can exploit this new spatial connectivity. The studio will focus on a site known as the Delancey Underground, an unused trolley terminal beneath Delancey Street at the base of the Williamsburg Bridge, that is speculated to become a subterranean public park, nicknamed the "LowLine."

Architecture After the Street

 
By far New York has the highest ridership of public transportation among US cities. A significant percentage of people take the subway, bus, or commuter rail daily. Combined with the options of traveling by foot, bike, or taxi, New York stands as the country's premier model of urban multi-modal transit. Given the great number of people who travel by these means it would seem that the private automobile is not entirely needed. But be that as it may, the automobile is the main means of transportation. Though we often don't consider it to be the case, the car is king in NYC. Accepting our four-wheel friend as a prerequisite, the studio will develop new architectural typologies by imagining a different presence for the car. If the contemporary city up until now has been designed to the car's specifications of movement, then we will develop new concepts of urban motion that influence the design of the car.