Jess Thomas

Student
My name is Jess Thomas. I am currently a third year graduate student at Columbia University, working towards my Masters of Architecture. Prior to coming to Columbia, I obtained a B.A. from Dartmouth College, majoring in Art History modified with Studio Art.
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Recent posts

05/03/2012

I did a series of time lapse drawings to understand plant’s movement and the forms that results from that movement. The drawings are meant to encapsulate the animated qualities of plants.

 
05/03/2012
 
05/03/2012


Mobile Night Garden is a mobile unit which traverses throughout the city offering a rejuvenating place for professionals who work night shifts. Night shift workers undergo tremendous stress and strain from the disruption of their circadian rhythm. Like the professionals who inhabit the garden, the plants circadian rhythms are reversed. During they day, the unit is closed, offering respite for the plants. At night, the unit illuminates and invites inhabitants to enjoy the interior garden. Four variations of the mobile garden exist: a southwestern, english, herb, and orchid garden. The plants are inserted into the module units - which spin on a rod/tracking system. The tracking system allows for a larger standing space while the more enclosed dome like structure provides a restful, plant-filled enclosure. The plant rehabilitation center collects and restores the plants during the time period that the mobile garden is not in service. The rehabilitation center is comprised of a series of water collecting devices and solar panels. The individual green houses store the four various garden types, regulating temperature, humidity, and water.

 
05/03/2012

I documented New York during night shift hours, conducting interviews with several individuals.

 
05/03/2012


I have created a mobile unit to house a museum of color. Its design, both exterior and interior, is used to explore the relationship between motion, color, and the city in a variety of ways.

The museum of color is seamlessly interwoven into an existing gondola transportation system. As the museum moves through the city, over silver-coated industrial areas, brownstone residential neighborhoods, parks, and rivers - its prismatic exterior reflects the colors of the city.

Its prism separates white light into several colors (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet); making visible what was once invisible. The mobile museum of color, through the use of prisms, color, and motion, allows one to visualize the colors of the city; re-contextualizing and mapping urban color.

As one observes the mobile museum of color from the ground or from a building, the museum both emits and refracts light. The museum, through the use of LED’s embedded in the color blocks, emits the current, most dominant color in its proximity.The pure prisms act to refract light, creating a shimmering effect, and, when at the right angle - create a series of rainbows  When the gondola is in movement, the abstracted color fields created through the use of color blocks and prisms, re-create the idea of the motion color blur. As a passenger, one experiences the museum of color by being immersed in a shimmering ever changing field of color. 

Three different systems within the museum allow the rider to understand how color can change ones perception of space within the city. The museum is composed of a series of prisms. Some of these geometries act as actual prisms - breaking down white light into separate colors and then reconstituting them as they pass through a second prism. The museum performs in a  similar manner to stop-motion photography. Stop motion photography, similar to a prism,  allows the spectator to see/understand what is usually invisible.  The museum of color not only translates white light into a spectrum of colors but also uses color blocks and view masters to augment one’s understanding and perception of color. Color blocks, also housed within the geometry of the triangular prism, work through a live feed camera input. The camera, located on the outside of its respective color block,  translates the most dominant color to the LED’s embedded within the prism- illuminating the triangular geometry with the current dominant urban color. The third method, also housed within the prism geometry, acts as a view master, allowing the viewer to see the city through various lenses of color. Through the use of a prosthesis (view master), ones understanding of color and the city are disconnected. Color lenses allow the spectator to understand the city in  a new context. The All three methods, the prism, color block, and master view, are heightened through the juxtaposition of transparent windows.  The windows allow the viewer to make connections between the colors experienced  and areas of the city, time of day, an season.

Because of the nature of seasonal and temporal changes, no two rides or experiences would ever be the same. The mobile Museum of color highlights not only the color variances of different districts and regions within the city but also temporal and seasonal changes that occur everyday. The mobile Museum of color acts to filter and separate the colors of the city; making visible what is often invisible or overlooked, allowing both visitor and spectator to view the city through a new lens.

 
03/19/2012
 
03/19/2012
 
02/21/2012
02/21/2012
02/16/2012