Stephen Chou

Student
Born in New York City, grew up in Taiwan, and has an background in electrical engineering.
Has profound interest in where IT technologies may stand in how architecture and urban spaces are experienced, communicated/negotiated, and produced/reproduced.
Has profound interest in aspects of interactions and memories that cannot be translated into data, whether physical or abstract, material or human.
Has worked at Tange Associates in Tokyo and SLAB Architecture in New York, and participated in GSAPP workshops in China and Greece.

Recent posts

05/18/2012
 
05/18/2012
 
05/18/2012
 
05/18/2012
 
05/18/2012

On the other hand, in order to impress and surprise the seasoned, sophisticated customers, pop-up stores and commercial campaigns had become increasingly popular in the city. “Planned spontaneity”, (serendipity, even) has become an effective new way to project curated quality experiences onto the expecting and un-expecting urban market.

The new Delancey Underground takes on “Planned Spontaneity” as a strategy for creating new urban public experiences. It is designed to stimulate and host pop-up programs, spontaneous usages and transient activities in the post-Web 2.5 city.

Critic: Juergen Mayer + Marc Kushner

 
05/18/2012

Getting Lost at the Delancey Underground:
Planned Spontaneity in the Post Web 2.5 City

The Delancey Underground is an ever-changing urban public space that constantly renews its appeal to the post Web 2.5 public.

While accumulated experiences and opinions has generated interest and motivated our travels in the city, it has also influenced - and to a certain degree - pre-determined our experiences. In an effort to eliminate unpleasant surprises, we have also diminished the possibility for interesting discoveries and encounters. The tendency of us being the knowledgeable, tech-savvy, I-know-where-I’m-going urbanite more and more prevails over us being the open-minded, slow-paced urban wanderer.

 
03/19/2012
 
03/19/2012
 
03/19/2012
 
03/19/2012